The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye

Book - 2001
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The hero-narrator of 'The Catcher in the Rye' is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children's voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden's voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.
Publisher: Boston : Little, Brown, 2001, c1951.
Edition: 1st Back Bay paperback ed.
ISBN: 9780316769174
0316769177
9781439576649
1439576645
9781417646395
141764639X
Call Number: SALIN
FICTION SALIN
Characteristics: 277 p. ; 21 cm
Subjects: Caulfield, Holden (Fictitious character) -- Fiction.
Runaway teenagers -- Fiction.
New York (N.Y.) -- Fiction.
Bildungsromans.

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t
taeyunericakang
Nov 22, 2020

The Catcher in the Rye Book Review
When Holden Caulfield gets expelled from another school right before the Christmas break, he is challenged to spend a few days on his own without his parents finding out about his expulsion. Holden jumps around New York City reconciling with old teachers and friends and meeting up with them at cafes and pubs. He checks into a hotel and lives off of the little money he has left, barely being able to feed himself. His day to day becomes an unexpecting adventure with him calling up and getting into payment troubles with a prostitute, sneaking into his little sister’s room at night, and even underage drinking and smoking. By the end of the book, Holden tries to explain to the readers about how he’s trying to get better and mentions his concerns about going back to school when it restarts. This allows the readers to wonder where Holden may be in that moment and how he may be feeling. I recommend this book to people between the ages of 15-18, because there are mentions of heavier topics. Still, the book is a fantastic read and is full of adventure and emotion. The author is able to illustrate the plot and characters so well that we are able to feel a personal connection to Holden and see deeper into everything that takes place. The book is very interesting and I most definitely recommend the book to people who enjoy new experiences.

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LycheeLily
Nov 12, 2020

If I had to describe this book with one word, I would say “intriguing.” Having read this book in my English class and being a sucker for deep analysis, I enjoyed this book quite a bit because of all the metaphors and hidden meanings the book has. Catcher captures a few days in the life of Holden Caulfield, a complicated character who most people dislike. But don’t let that deter you from reading this novel! I found myself relating to Holden many times as I read and gained new perspectives of my life from him, and I bet that you will too. Salinger created a book that can make you think about your world differently- just give it a chance!

a
alexqise
Oct 27, 2020

Holden Caulfield is a young man undergoing treatment in a mental hospital in the 1950s. The story begins after Holden’s classes at Pencey in which he already failed four out of five. He is being expelled and is scheduled to go back to Manhattan 3 days later. Back in his dorm, an already irritated Holden learns that his roommate, Stradlater has been going out with his ex. When Stradlater returns, Holden attacks him and ends up with a bloody nose. Having enough of Pencey, Holden decides to go to Manhattan early and stay in a hotel. I like this book because of the interesting plot and constant drama. The character development in Holden is also fantastic.

d
dgiard
Sep 28, 2020

I was in high school when I first read J.D. Salinger's "The Catcher in the Rye" - about the same age as the narrator Holden Caufield.

I did not have much in common with Caufield. I have never attended or even visited a private boarding school, much less been kicked out of several as Holden had. At 15 or 16, I did not have the cash necessary to hide and entertain myself in Manhattan for three days. And I did not have the nerve to strike up conversations with strangers or attempt to buy liquor in a bar or hire a prostitute.

But something about Holden's inner monologue resonated with me. He felt alone in the world - disconnected from his surroundings. He wavered between feelings of superiority over the phonies in his life and inadequacy due to his own failings. He was intelligent, but unfocused - a classic underachiever.

Holden is an extrovert. He craves the company of others and has no trouble approaching strangers. But he is self-destructive and manages to destroy nearly every relationship in his life. Rude to nearly everyone - sometimes flying into a rage at the slightest provocation. Although his observations are often profound, their legitimacy is damaged by his focus on the negative. Haunted by the death of his brothers, he stumbles through life with no plan. The only genuine relationship he has is with his younger sister Phoebe.

Holden is far from likeable. He is too judgmental and far too cynical; but his frustration is understandable, which makes him relatable. He is the worst parts of me - judging the faults of those to whom he is attracted, but harboring resentment against himself. Holden is my feelings of alienation, angst, and insecurity that rear their ugly heads from time to time.

I felt this a lot in high school.

And now – decades later – I sometimes still fall into that same pit.

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blackarrows7954
Aug 21, 2020

The Catcher in the Rye by Salinger J.D. is about 16 year old Holden Caulfield. In the first few chapters, I was convinced that Holden was a typical rebellious teenager who believes what everyone else says is incorrect. Holden is like a typical teenager that hates everything, but he has a really different perspective on the world: he sees everything as fake and depressing. The story also is very good. I think a lot of teenagers have a lifestyle that they want but it is only a fantasy. This book touches on Holden’s fantasy and how he tries to reach the fantasy. I really like the book because it is relatable but through someone with a very different story than me.

k
karyn8787
Aug 18, 2020

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Sallinger is a coming of age novel that tells the story of a 16 year old boy, Holden Caulfield. After flunking out of his fancy prep school, Holden decides to go to New York to escape the phoniness and affectation of his former life. Holden holds himself on a pedestal of sorts because he thinks he is above most everyone else in society because he is not “phony.” He does not understand how much of the world works and in that sense is extremely immature. While in New York, Holden reunites with old friends and meets new people. It is these experiences that make Holden reflect inward on his own personality, aspirations, and immaturity and “come of age,” per se.
It may be because I read this for school and was forced to annotate and overanalyze the entire novel, but I did not enjoy The Catcher in the Rye. I felt like Holden’s character and the entire book in general was extremely predictable. Furthermore, while I understand it was not Sallinger’s intention to create a conventional, likeable character, for the vast majority of the novel Holden was incredibly annoying, pretentious, and phony. This would make reading the book a frustrating, tedious task because I could not bring myself to sympathize with a hypocritical character with a massive superiority complex. With that said, I do see the draws of this book since it does not over romanticize the life of a teenager like most other stories do and it is very well written. I did also enjoy the ending because Holden finally grew out of his childish mindset and it was heartwarming to see. Nevertheless, I just cannot bring myself to really enjoy a book with such an unlikeable main character and relatively predictable storyline.

t
TheBorgQueen
Jul 28, 2020

Catcher in the Rye is about Holden Caulfield, a 16 year old boy with a sour view about life. He thinks everyone around him are “phonies”, or people who are not genuine. Holden is eventually kicked out of his school, Pencey Prep, because of his low grades. He goes back to New York, where he spends his night roaming the city instead of going home. This book is a coming of age novel, where Holden Caulfield learns about becoming an adult and the things that come along with it.

I would recommend this book to anyone high school age and above. The message of the book may be lost to anyone younger, since many high school students relate to Holden a lot. This is a really good book, despite controversies around it. I liked how the author was able to describe many feelings that teenagers feel in such an accurate way. Many of the things that Holden said were things that I thought to myself, which is why it was so enjoyable to read.

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IshaanGupta30
Jul 24, 2020

The novel details two days in the life of Holden Caulfield after being expelled from a prestigious prep school. Holden travels to New York City all alone and rents a room in a hotel. There, he encounters situations that make him feel uncomfortable and calls them “phony.” He thinks everything adults do is phony and so are they. He then goes to his family and spends time with his sister. As compared to all the bad experiences with adults and teenagers, Holden finds a lot of happiness doing childish things with his sister, Phoebe.
Holden seems to be a relatable character throughout the novel. Yes, there are a couple moments which may seem like Holden is overreacting, but the fact is that his character is very interesting and the experience of the movie would not have been the same. I really liked the concept of the novel, especially because of the theme of innocence. The journey of Holden trying to save his and other children’s innocence is one to be read.

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gippy011
Jul 07, 2020

Catcher in the Rye Review
Catcher in the Rye is a novel written by J.D. Salinger and it follows a young man named Holden as he wanders around New York City and learns about himself and his place in the world. The story may seem small in scale but it has a lot of ideas about being a teenager and growing up in a changing society. A key constant is a change and the effect of it on people and what it can cause people like Holden to deal with. The novel is really relatable for younger people especially hence why it became a staple in high school classes. This novel is very good at conveying its ideas in a feasible and relatable manner for its audience. It’s really good at that especially. While Holden can come off as unrelatable for others he’s great at serving his purpose. The novel struggles with grabbing the reader’s attention at first in my opinion and it takes some time for it to find itself but once it gets going it’s really great but it can struggle at first. Other than that there’s not much else to say with spoiling it. This is a very strong novel and a must-read, especially for teens.

4 out of 5 stars
Age Rating: 14-above

a
Arnavb1
Jun 30, 2020

The novel The Catcher in the Rye by J.D Salinger is an American Classic which sets the stage for millions of future coming of age stories while creating believable characters living in a cruel world. The novel follows a teenager named Holden Caulfield who sets out to explore New York City and find his purpose in life. The controversial book is guaranteed to keep readers’ attention and spark up numerous conversations. One problem with this book is that it is wordy sometimes I would rate this book 13+.

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Age

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l
LycheeLily
Nov 12, 2020

LycheeLily thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

a
alexqise
Oct 27, 2020

alexqise thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

b
blackarrows7954
Aug 21, 2020

blackarrows7954 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

k
karyn8787
Aug 18, 2020

karyn8787 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

i
IshaanGupta30
Jul 24, 2020

IshaanGupta30 thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

g
gurleen03
Jun 30, 2020

gurleen03 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

j
jpedone21
Jun 10, 2020

jpedone21 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

l
lkim17
May 08, 2020

lkim17 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

a
anne1212li
Mar 26, 2020

anne1212li thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

e
ea304gt
Jul 05, 2019

ea304gt thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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Quotes

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g
Germophobe
Oct 07, 2020

“The man falling isn’t permitted to feel or hear himself hit bottom. He just keeps falling and falling. The whole arrangement’s designed for men, who at some time or other in their lives, were looking for something their own environment couldn’t supply them with. Or they thought their environment couldn’t supply them with. So they gave up looking. They gave it up before they ever really even got started.” p.207

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Germophobe
Oct 07, 2020

“Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in a big field of rye and all... And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff—...” p.191

g
Germophobe
Oct 06, 2020

“When we were at Whooton, he’d make you describe the most personal stuff that happened to you, but if you started asking him questions about himself, he got sore. These intellectual guys don’t like to have an intellectual conversation with you unless they’re running the whole thing.” p.163

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Germophobe
Oct 06, 2020

“Certain things they should stay the way they are. You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone. I know that’s impossible, but it’s too bad anyway.” p.136

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Germophobe
Oct 04, 2020

“I slept in the garage the night he died, and I broke all the goddam windows with my fist, just for the hell of it. I even tried to break all the windows on the station wagon... It was a very stupid thing to do, I’ll admit, but I hardly didn’t even know I was doing it, and you didn’t know Allie.” p.44

b
blue_llama_157
Jul 10, 2018

I hope to hell that when I do die somebody has the sense to just dump me in the river or something. Anything except sticking me in a goddam cemetary. People coming and putting a bunch of flowers on your stomach on Sunday, and all that crap. Who wants flowers when you’re dead? Nobody.

r
reginator_22
Jan 25, 2018

“Don’t ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody.”

e
elishalozares
Jul 19, 2016

"I can't explain what I mean. And even if I could, I'm not sure I'd feel like it."

t
tomadou1
Jul 20, 2015

What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn't happen much, though.

k
KABuck
Jul 05, 2015

All the kids kept trying to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she'd fall off the goddam horse, but I didn't say anything or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off...
(Salinger, 273 – 274)

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Notices

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a
amlo
Sep 06, 2013

Coarse Language: an extreme amount throughout the book

a
amlo
Sep 06, 2013

Violence: some, very descriptive

a
amlo
Sep 06, 2013

Sexual Content: some

c
CindyDiane
Aug 01, 2013

Coarse Language: There is a LOT of cursing through the book. Holden's favorite term seems to be G-d and uses it constantly. Towards the end of the book he finds the phrase F-you a few times.

c
CindyDiane
Aug 01, 2013

Violence: Slightly descriptive violence involving fights with other guys.

c
CindyDiane
Aug 01, 2013

Sexual Content: While nothing happens sexually, there is a lot of talk and the main character (Holden) does attempt to purchase a hooker for the evening with the intention of sleeping with her but chickens out after she arrives.

o
orangeana
Jul 13, 2013

Coarse Language: a lot of it - but that's what makes it funny

l
liya6
Jul 12, 2013

Violence: Some

l
liya6
Jul 12, 2013

Coarse Language: A lot

l
liya6
Jul 12, 2013

Sexual Content: Some

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Summary

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m
Marihyd
Jun 21, 2016

When a boy gets kicked out of his school, he wanders into New York to avoid the wrath of his mother. During this time, he reflects on his memories and catches up with old friends.

a
agk7
Jun 29, 2015

Holden Caulfield is trying to transition into the adult world. He leaves his prep school; Pencey, and goes to New York City for three days in attempt to relax before going home. Holden has many encounters with people that give us insight to his view of the world and the people around him.

k
klemcicle
Jun 25, 2015

This story is about a college dropout... well, kicked out boy who takes his time getting home over the span of a few days before he has to break the news to his parents that he was kicked out of school. Again. This story is about what he does in the time being while in the north east coast exploring the cities.

v
VampireHunterD
May 12, 2013

Events that occur in the days after Holden Caulfield gets kicked out of highschool.

valentinavl Mar 29, 2013

Holden Caulfield is a 17 yr old boy has been kicked out of Pencey, wants to save children from adulthood by metaphorically being the Catcher in the Rye.

f
fearlessforever
Dec 11, 2012

Basically a summary of Holden Caulfield's uneventful life for three days. He gets kicked out of his High School and journey's back home for Christmas.

r
re_discover
Jun 22, 2011

"And so, that made me kind of depressed."

"But then I didn't feel like it."

The end.

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