The Bean Trees

The Bean Trees

A Novel

Book - 2009
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"Clear-eyed and spirited, Taylor Greer grew up poor in rural Kentucky with the goals of avoiding pregnancy and getting away. But when she heads west with high hopes and a barely functional car, she meets the human condition head-on. By the time Taylor arrives in Tucson, Arizona, she has acquired a completely unexpected child, a three-year-old American Indian girl named Turtle, and must somehow come to terms with both motherhood and the necessity for putting down roots. Hers is a story about love and friendship, abandonment and belonging, and the discovery of surprising resources in apparently empty places."--Publisher website.
Publisher: New York : HarperPerennial/ModernClassics, 2009, c1988.
Edition: 1st ed.
ISBN: 9780061765223
9780061097317
9780060915544
0060915544
9780060175795
0060175796
0061097314
9780060158637
0060158638
Call Number: KINGSOLVER
Characteristics: 246 p. ; 22 cm.
Subjects: Indian children -- North America -- Fiction.
Orphans -- Fiction.
Friendship -- Fiction.
Automobile travel -- Fiction.
Women travelers -- Fiction.

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a
andreabilyeu
Jul 29, 2020

This story stays with you.

s
suveen
Jul 13, 2020

Bean Trees
The novel Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver is such a heart-touching book. It is the story about a woman names Taylor and her journey from her confining home in Kentucky. This journey is filled with ups and downs with unforgettable experiences. Taylor only has a car and very little money, yet she is so courageous and determined to find her true calling. I personally loved this book and all of the characters. This book was so unique but really pressed upon an important issue in today’s society, immigration. It is also about woman empowerment, and Taylor’s courage in the book is really inspiring. Overall, I would definitely recommend this book to others and I found it very captivating and enjoyable.

k
kountzcl
Feb 25, 2020

Wonderful story. Yes, it took a few chapters for it to engage me, but the warmth of the place created made me feel near Turtle and Taylor. I loved the speech patterns; "I don't know how the good Lord packed so much guts into one little person," Taylor says to Mama, and it's true of Taylor too. I also enjoyed Unsheltered...

d
dawdlibrarybooks
Nov 14, 2019

skimmed a lot.

JCLS_Ashland_Kristin Jul 22, 2019

I really enjoy Kingsolver's strong female-centered stories. This one did not disappoint. While written about 30 years ago, it has some really current thematic material in the form of a Guatemalan immigration story.

g
glotet
Sep 28, 2018

The story reflects in horrific truth what was actually unfolding under the Argentinian dictatorship in the 1970's. How courageous of the author to undertake in a first novel such a situation which also reflects the reality of challenges of our Indigineous Culture in North America.

p
peacebenow
Aug 26, 2018

It took me a bit to get into the "Bean Trees" but by one third the of way through I was hooked. Tyler, Turtle and friends are out of the ordinary people on an journey not planned whom you soon become attached. Kingsolver's writing style grows and is extraordinary by the end. I signed out "Pigs in heaven" the sequel as soon as I finished.

DBRL_IdaF Nov 15, 2017

Funny and touching and painful and affirming. Not a word is wasted in the writing in this novel. Kingsolver's use of language in story-telling is masterful. Her characters are real and flawed and lovable.

The protagonist, Marietta Greer, is a tiny-town Kentucky girl raised by a strong single mother who kept body and soul together through housecleaning work.

Wanting something more for her life than she can find in her hometown, Marietta works and saves her money until she has enough to buy a mostly-running car. Then she sets off driving west, ending up in Tucson.

By the time she arrives there, she's changed her name to Taylor and received the surprise gift of a non-verbal toddler, a little girl she calls Turtle. Taylor makes a home with another single mom, while landing a job at Jesus is Lord Used Tires, also a stop on the underground railroad for Guatemalan refugees(It's the 1980s.) She learns that the world can be both a whole lot worse and a whole lot better than she'd ever known.

c
csrestall
Apr 21, 2016

I read this book as a novel study for one of my students it was better than I anticipated. I enjoyed the characters and story lines. I enjoyed seeing the characters develop from the beginning to end. It was a simple read and enjoyable.

kdwaynec Apr 01, 2016

I picked this up a few years ago, needing 'anything' to read and found it to be much better than I had expected. Very funny in places and I'll try another by Kingsolver, maybe Pigs because it sounds like Part II

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kdwaynec Apr 01, 2016

In case of fire, yell "FIRE!"

k
KCWeimer
Jan 24, 2015

Saddness is more or less like a head cold- with patience, it passes. Depression is like cancer

k
kubiak458
Apr 18, 2013

"You from out of town?" he asked after a while, eyeing my car. "No," I said. "I go to Kentucky every year to get my license plate."

c
christinex1
Jul 18, 2012

And so what I promised myself was that I would drive West until my car stopped running, and there I would stay.

Notices

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c
csrestall
Apr 21, 2016

Sexual Content: Deals with the potential sexual abuse of a minor

c
christinex1
Jul 18, 2012

Coarse Language: a bit

Age

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c
csrestall
Apr 21, 2016

csrestall thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Summary

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c
csrestall
Apr 21, 2016

Taylor Greer decides to leave her small town and drive until she finds somewhere new. On the way she is given a native child which has been abused. They settle in Tucson. This novel deals with their trials and tribulations.

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