I went into this book without knowing much about it. All I knew was that it was, and still is, considered a classic and it revolves around a teenager. Not even my copy of the book had a summary or a page dedicated to the author, and I took it as the book's way of telling me to just simply read the story it had to tell. With those things in mind, I figured that now, while I am still a teen, was the perfect time to read The Catcher in the Rye.
To put it in the simplest of terms, Holden Caulfield is a lonely boy who roams the streets of New York, and despite the countless characters he interacts with, he has a depressingly hard time finding someone who actually listens to him. After reading others' opinions of the book, it appears that there are some who find Holden boring or repetitive with his thoughts. While I can understand why some may feel that way, it wasn't the case for me. Holden is very opinionated about many things, yet there is still much he conceals from the readers. I deeply encourage others to focus on his mental, rather than physical, journey. I found myself to be fascinated with Holden, despite how repetitive he may sound, and as I approached the end of the story, I realized that I didn't want it to end. I didn't want to leave Holden. I felt an incredible sadness for him throughout his journey, to the point where it somehow persuaded my cold-hearted self to fill my eyes with tears, a rare instance that has never happened while reading. Perhaps it was the solemn, silent mood of the 4am night I finished the book that encouraged me to feel deeply. Whether it was simply the story itself, or my emotions taking a larger toll on me than usual, The Catcher in the Rye is a book that has made an unforgettable imprint on my heart. It's one of those books that I will be sure to reread after many, many years when I am no longer a naive teenager, but an adult with an abundance of life experiences, just to see if it hits different.

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